A typical Saturday morning in Paris

Most things in France can be described with respect to how they are "in theory" and "in practice."  In theory, the small apartment that I rent is super-cute.  In practice, it is usually draped with drying laundry.  Here is my kitchen--the sheets are draped all over the bathroom.
Most things in France can be described with respect to how they are “in theory” and “in practice.” In theory, the small apartment that I rent is super-cute. In practice, it is usually draped with drying laundry. Here is my kitchen–the sheets are draped all over the bathroom.

In general, private time is valued more than work time here, much differently from in the United States.  People are generally not willing to give up their personal time in exchange for a small amount of extra money, so the vast majority of Parisian businesses close quite early, by American standards–by 7 PM, or 8 PM at the latest.  This means that if you work at all past 6 PM and you have a significant commute home, you’re going to have trouble doing any normal shopping.  Additionally, most businesses are closed on Sunday.  So, Saturday is a day when many stores are crowded with people buying all of the stuff that they weren’t able to pick up during the week.

By noon today, I had done two loads of laundry and had been to the fromagerie (cheese shop), the fruit marchand (stall keeper, shop keeper, merchant), the boulangerie (bread bakery, as opposed to a patisserie, or pasty bakery), and the fleuriste (florist), with a final stop at the supermarché (supermarket–actually a very small one, rather than the Monoprix, which, as you may remember from previous posts, is a horrid experience) for the stuff that I couldn’t find anywhere else.  Along the way, I popped into a Middle Eastern restaurant for a quick lamb tongue sandwich–yum.  This leaves me time for a long Saturday afternoon of grading corpus linguistics papers–yay!

  • le/la fleuriste: florist.

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