American English reading practice: John McCain, Trump, and torture

I’m a US military veteran, and proud of it. If anyone hates torture more than a military person, I don’t know who it is.

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John McCain was shot down and held prisoner for 5 and a half years by the North Vietnamese. He never recovered physically from the frequent and lengthy torture sessions that he underwent. The son of an admiral, he was offered early release, but refused to be set free until all of his fellow prisoners were. Meanwhile, Trump avoided the draft, later bragged about it repeatedly in public, and attacked McCain repeatedly as a candidate and as president. Asshole.

Afin de travailler votre amerloque, voilà un reportage sur la torture, John McCain, et Trump.  On débute avec du vocabulaire, et puis je vous invite à suivre le lien vers l‘article dans son intégralité.

For more on a proud US military veteran’s opposition to Trump’s immoral ideas about torture, see this post.  Do you have corrections for my crappy French?  The Comments section awaits you.

Speaking out on torture and a Trump nominee, ailing McCain roils Washington

to speak out: to say something by way of a public statement, typically criticizing something.  Note that the preposition here is on, but it could also be about, and possibly others.

ailing: sick.  If English had the concept of langage soutenu, this would be soutenu, like many of the words in this article.

to roil: to stir up, to disturb, to put in a state of disorder (see Merriam-Webster, sense 2)

Sen. John McCain is 2,200 miles from Washington and hasn’t been on Capitol Hill in five months, but he showed this week that he remains a potent force in national politics and a polarizing figure within the Republican Party.

potent: powerful

polarizing: “to break up into opposing factions or groupings: a campaign that polarized the electorate” (Merriam-Webster, sense 3). Today’s Republican Party can generally be divided into people who like McCain, a war hero and basically OK guy right up to his recent death–versus immoral shitbags who cravenly support Trump no matter how low he stoops into the mud.  Thus: he’s a polarizing figure within the party.

But his declaration Wednesday in opposition to Gina Haspel, President Trump’s nominee for CIA director, has uniquely roiled the political scene. The denunciation has prompted reactions from fellow senators and a former vice president, as well as intemperate remarks from some Republicans aligned with Trump, including a White House aide.
to prompt:to serve as the inciting cause of : evidence prompting an investigation” (Merriam-Webster, sense 3).
intemperate:  not temperate, where “temperate” means “akeeping or held within limits not extreme or excessive MILDmarked by an absence or avoidance of extravagance, violence, or extreme partisanship” (Merriam-Webster, senses 2a and 2d)”
It has revived the fierce debate over torture and its effectiveness in extracting information in the years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks — from a man who speaks from experience. McCain was held for 5½ years in a North Vietnamese prison, often deprived of sleep, food and medical care, after a jet he piloted was shot down over Hanoi.
No need for translation here, but for context, it’s worth knowing that McCain was a war hero and a staunch supporter of the US military–and hugely, vocally opposed to torture.  In contrast, Trump the draft-dodger (réfractaire, I think) has long advocated it.  Asshole.
Click here for the complete article in the Washington Post.

2 thoughts on “American English reading practice: John McCain, Trump, and torture”

  1. Well said, I agree with your intention in all its aspects though I have to say I can’t approve anything linked to military actions since at least WWI – including WWI, “this Imperialist war” as they said before scandalously voting war credits in German, French and other parliaments .
    Nothing to say about your French paragraph, kudos . Just, you seem to use “amerloque” a lot . Do you often hear it, because personally I don’t that much .
    About “intemperate” a funny fact is French use “intempérant”, that also means an off limits behaviour but that has become, through centuries I guess, reserved to intemperate consumption of alcohol, food … or sex .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “Intemperate” can have the same meaning in English. I don’t think it’s very common with that sense, but maybe I’m just not part of the right conversations…

      Amerloque: yes, I do hear it on occasion–enough so that I didn’t realize that it wasn’t common. Maybe I’m taking part in the WRONG conversations. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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